Tuesday 7 April
Powered by Ajaxy
Feb 27, 2020 @ 9:46

New actions for migratory species included in global pact

The 13th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS COP13) concluded with the adoption of a number of significant resolutions and decisions to address the conservation needs and threats facing migratory species around the globe.

CMS COP13 was the first of a series of international nature-related meetings in 2020, which will culminate in the UN Biodiversity Conference at the end of this year, when a new global biodiversity strategy for the next decade will be adopted – the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework.

“With COP13, the important role of CMS in protecting nature around the world has been strongly embraced. CMS is uniquely positioned to address the conservation of migratory species and their habitats, and to contribute to reversing the trends of species and biodiversity loss worldwide,” CMS Executive Secretary Amy Fraenkel said.

CMS COP13 was the largest ever in the history of the Convention, with 2,550 people attending including 263 delegates representing 82 Parties, 11 delegates from 5 non-Party countries, 50 representatives from United Nations agencies, 70 representatives of international NGOs, 127 representatives of national NGOs and over 100 members of both national and international media.

Ten new species were added to CMS Appendices at COP13. Of this, seven species were added to Appendix I, which provides the strictest protection: the Asian Elephant, Jaguar, Great Indian Bustard, Bengal Florican, Little Bustard, Antipodean Albatross and the Oceanic White-tip Shark.

The Urial, Smooth Hammerhead Shark and the Tope Shark were listed for protection under Appendix II, which covers migratory species that have an unfavourable conservation status and would benefit from enhanced international cooperation and conservation actions.

New and extended Concerted Actions with targeted conservation plans were also agreed for 14 species.



 

Trending News

Recommended on sister sites

Copyright © 2020 Food Evolution - foodevolution.com.ph. TechCellar.com